Posted by: soapchix | March 28, 2008

Johnson’s Baby Cream–not so good for baby.

People have a hard time wrapping their mind around the fact that Johnson’s Baby Products are not as gentle as they thought. But I brought my camera back to Target and snapped a picture of the Baby Cream to post another pictorial highlighting all the unnecessary chemical additives in it. Parabens? Check. Phthalates? Check. Possible carcinogens? Check.

I’ve highlighted in red all the additives that are a high hazard to humans, according to Cosmetic Safety Database. In Johnson’s Baby Cream, these are:

FRAGRANCE.
Ah, our old nemesis. We meet again. Unless otherwise noted, fragrance=phthalates, which are an endocrine disruptor, among other things.

according to the American Academy of Dermatology, fragrance is the number one cause of allergic cosmetic reactions. Phthalates are added to help fragrances last longer, according the American Chemistry Council.

CETEARETH 6.
Otherwise known as 1,4 Dioxane. SafeMama has a great blog as to why this is a no-no in cosmetic products, here:

Dioxane is a known eye and respiratory irritant and is suspected of causing damage to the central nervous system, liver and kidneys. Accidental exposure to people working with it has been known to cause deaths. Dioxane is classified by the IARC as a Group 2B carcinogen: possibly carcinogenic to humans due to the fact that it is a known carcinogen in animals.

BENZALKONIUM CHLORIDE.
Restricted in Japan and Canada, this is linked to immunetoxicity and is a skin allergen.

*****
I’ve highlighted in yellow all the things that are a moderate hazard to humans, according to the Safe Cosmetic Database.

ALL THE THINGS ENDING IN -PARABEN.
So Organic has this to say about parabens:

Parabens are antimicrobials; preservatives used to give products an extended shelf life and to prevent them going bad.

Parabens are everywhere; they are not only used as a preservative in cosmetic products, but also in food. A 1995 study showed that they were present in 99% of leave on cosmetic products, and 77% of rinse off products. (Rastogi et al., 1995 cited in Darbre et al 2004) (1). Parabens are easily absorbed through the skin.

There is debate as to the carcinogenic effects of parabens in humans. Parabens have been found in breast cancer cells, and regardless of if it caused cancer or not, this indicates that they can easily get into skin cells and remain intact for a long period of time. Ash and I limit our exposure as much as possible, and because our Serendipity Bath products are made in the same month they are sold, we do not need or want to extend shelf life.

TETRASODIUM EDTA.
This actually is a low hazard in the database; however, I bumped it up as a moderate hazard because it is a penetration enhancer…it literally piledrives all the other additives deep into your skin. These are not things I really want deep in my skin, or in my baby’s skin either. We shun this ingredient.

****
I’ve highlighted in purple all the things that are Ashley and my pet peeves. Ingredients that we see and cringe at.

MINERAL OIL.

This is a by-product in the distillation of petroleum to produce gasoline. It is a substance of relatively low value, and it is produced in very large quantities. Mineral oil is a commonly-found ingredient in baby lotions, cold creams, ointments and low-grade cosmetics as an alternative to more expensive oils.


This is the reason cosmetics can be sold so cheaply. The commercial cosmetic companies use mineral oil as a filler to take the place of other natural, moisturizing, skin friendly oils that we use exclusively in our soaps and other bath products. It’s the difference between eating a piece of fruit versus eating a processed fruit snack.

CETYL/STEARYL ALCOHOL.
These may be animal byproducts, which we stear away from. And, speaking of animals, did you know Johnson & Johnson still tests on animals? Yeah. Nice. No thanks.

RED & YELLOW DYE.
Ash and I personally don’t like to eat this stuff, and we don’t like to put it on our skin either.
****

So, there you have it. Johnson’s Baby Cream is not so good for baby. In fact, a whopping 85% of the baby moisturizers listed on Cosmetic Database have lower hazard concerns than this lotion. 100% of our Wild Child Baby products are better than Johnson’s products, for sure!

Other Helpful Articles:
Clean Up Your Soap! A link to our other blogs about what other things the FDA approves in commercial soaps.


Responses

  1. I have been using the same products for my kids. Thanks for the information. I think I would rather buy organic products for my kids.

  2. Great post, I hate Johnson and Johnson with a passion, mostly because of their animal testing policies. I know quite a bit about the various nasties in commercial toiletries, but its awesome you’ve taken the time to mark them all up and explain!

    I like the ‘may also contain’…nice quality control at Johnson and Johnson factories then…

  3. Ummm, I’ve used J&J products with all 3 of my kids, along with everyone else in my family with kids, with no ill effects at all! My youngest is a preemie, and he has no dry skin, no eczema, and I use it on him everyday. And my oldest is 20 now & still prefers to use J&J products over anything else, because she loves the way it smells & makes her skin so soft. So just because a product has INGREDIENTS in it doesn’t make it BAD FOR YOU!! I did receive some “organic” lotion (forget what it was called) when my now 3 yr old was a baby, and it irritated his skin, causing him to break out in a bad rash.

  4. This article is VERY biased and one-sided. Show us the facts!

    When people make claims like these, they need to be backed with EVIDENCE. Nowhere in this article do I see references to high-quality, non-biased studies that indicate these products to be dangerous.

    I want to see these studies. And if they are on lab rats, were they subjected to these ingredients in concentrations 100’s of times higher than what we would ever be exposed to in using products that contain them?

  5. I think that was a great article and I do not need to see case studies in order for me to make up my mind that anything with ingredients named like that can be anything but nasty for a baby.
    whats wrong with good old fashioned cold pressed olive oil? cant go wrong there…. no chemicals no preservatives, no carcinogens why would anyone want to question the integrity of this article? I do not think that it is biased at all, its a very well informed point of view, and here here to telling them to go stuff themselves, NO MORE ANIMAL TESTING!!!!!!!!!! Johnson and Johnson suck!

  6. [...] Baby Acne Johnson’s Baby Cream–not so good for baby. Serendipity Soap Dish You can check any future products (or current ones you have) here: Skin Deep: Cosmetic Safety [...]

  7. I think that it’s ridiculous that people are still so ignorant to what really goes on! If you think this article is so bias…. here’s an idea… use your brain and do your own research. All of the informations out there, but be prepared because the truth is scary! WAKE UP EVERYONE!!! Anyone who does testing on animals are no good in my book. Rock on soapchix!

  8. Check the ingredients lists by researching through use of the Organic Consumers Association (who just this year has lawsuits against some companies for false claims) and also through Dr. Joseph Mercola’s website. The verdict is that nothing in this cream is good for humans. Anyone with half a brain wouldn’t continue to use something they know is questionable. Just because the “damage” hasn’t surfaced in a 20 year old, doesn’t mean the damage isn’t done. Neurological damage sometimes doesn’t show up for decades. I wouldn’t use Johnson & Johnson or anything commercial (except organic based stuff) on my grandkids any more than I would have used it on my own kids, who are now 33, 31 and 21. It might smell good, but if you wouldn’t eat it, I wouldn’t put it on my baby’s skin.

    http://www.oca.org

    http://www.mercola.com

    Use the search feature and check out what they have to say on these ingredients. And they’re not alone in their findings.

    NO ONE should be using that junk, IMO.

  9. Well now… arsenic is all natural and organic, as are selenium and lots of other heavy metals. None of which are good for you in large quantities. Your body does require selenium though. So, is it bad for you or good for you? Or, does it matter in what quantity?

    Just because something is “organic” does NOT make it safe. Testing is what determines if it’s safe in the quantity used. So, no matter who makes it, or what their (and their partners) beliefs are, if it’s not been tested it’s only a guess. But of course, that’s scientific thought not the religion of being “green”

  10. [...] a blog loaded with great info: Serendipity Soap Dish Some entries you might want to check out: Johnson’s Baby Cream–not so good for baby What’s the difference between Phthalates and Parabens? Feeling ambitious? Make your own! [...]

  11. love your site

  12. My 3-month old son screams when we use our new bottle of Johnson’s Bedtime Lotion on him (don’t worry, tonight was the last time, since we just made the connection!) before we were using imitations that did NOT have ceteareth-6 in them. I wonder if that’s the culprit? Bummer. The lotion smells fabulous but of course it’s not worth it!!! Thanks for the info.

  13. Yanno, there is a reason there are such inconceivably high rates of diseases nowadays. We are poisoning ourselves. A teenager or young 20-something may not see the impact until later in life because of the sheer volume of pollutants they have slowly covered and filled their bodies with for years. Do some back-research. I have lost count of how many seemingly innocent (because it’s on a shelf, smells good and looks pretty) ingredients are only used in cosmetic products for no other reason than they are CHEAP. Same with food. The staggering rates of breast cancer and Alzheimer’s were unheard of 100 years ago. I firmly believe that it’s because 100 years ago, more products were natural, with a few notable exceptions.

  14. i used j&j product for my baby but this is not good for him.its makes my baby skin dry.now my baby’s doctar told me use yellow pears

  15. [...] Before E was born we received some toiletries as shower gifts and we were happy we didn`t have to go out and buy them ourselves. It was one less thing to do. Since then I`ve learned a bit about the kinds of things they put in lotions and shampoos etc, even in baby products. [...]

  16. johnsons-baby-cream-not-so-good-for-baby

  17. i wounder if it was made the same way back in the 50’s and 60’s ? e-mail me id you know

  18. Glad to have found this. And to all the people who want to say they have always used it and had no side effects…not all side effects show up right away. A lot of chemicals stay in the body over time and cause small amounts of damage that can show up later in life that we would not link to body products used. As infants, we are pure and fresh…when introducing products to a brand new life, free of toxic exposure, one might consider what we put on and in our infants because they cannot process out toxicity like adults can. It is every parents choice but with all the info out there, you should do your own research before calling out someone as biased.

  19. I have a bigger problem with baby wipes causing rashes than anything else. A towlette filled with soap that is left to dry on the skin. I used wet washclothes and solved the rash issue. We are covered in and breathing in and eating chemicals all day every day for the sake of convienience(sp?) Organic products are not feasible for an average family because of cost. But there are better cheaper solutions. Like wet washclothes for wipes. Personally i used ivory, because its what was used on me and it worked marvelously;)

  20. I visited this site to know about j&j products but this made me more confused

  21. I really think that a healthy balance & common sense should dictate how everyone should determine what is best fot THEM.I,for instance,have used Johnson’s baby cream for 40+ YEARS—for soothing shaved legs,for really dry feet & hands,for a smooth complexion, for irritation in (other) body parts—I bought a CASE of jars years ago when I found out it was not available.It is something that I grew up with,it serves the purpose,& I LOVE it—ENOUGH SAID!!!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 27 other followers

%d bloggers like this: